Submissions for current Refugee Issues UNHCR >> Dadaab Refugee Camp

May 27, 2010

Hi

I received this today. Those who can please send in a submission for the Dadaab refugees.

Below the reminder is the document and submission form.

stavros

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A reminder that the Australian Refugee Rights Alliance (ARRA) is calling for brief submissions from individuals and refugee community groups regarding current issues of concern to refugee populations in and from the Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa regions.

The due date for submissions is 31 May. Please see the attached information sheet for further details on making a submission. Feel free to distribute this information to your networks. If you have any queries, please feel free to contact me as per the details below.

We look forward to receiving your submissions!

Kind regards, Lucy Morgan Information & Membership Officer Refugee Council of Australia

Suite 4A6, 410 Elizabeth Street Surry Hills NSW 2010 Phone: 61 2 9211 9333 Fax: 61 2 9211 9288 email: info@refugeecouncil.org.au

www.refugeecouncil.org.au

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INVITATION FOR SUBMISSIONS

TO THE UNHCR- NGO CONSULTATIONS

The Australian Refugee Rights Alliance (ARRA) is calling for brief submissions from individuals and refugee community groups regarding current issues of concern to refugee populations in and from the Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa regions.

ARRA is a coalition of Australian NGOs, refugee advocates and academics. Organisations involved in ARRA include the Centre for Refugee Research of University of NSW, Refugee Council of Australia, Amnesty International and Act for Peace (National Council of Churches).  Each year, representatives from ARRA travel to Geneva to participate in the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ NGO consultations.

Prior to the UNHCR meetings, the group prepares a comprehensive set of documents addressing policy issues of shared concern. This process enables more effective advocacy at the meetings by ensuring coordinated and targeted action by the Australian delegation. In 2010, the meetings will occur in late June.

Individuals and refugee community groups are invited to make submissions on issues they would like to recommend that ARRA put forward during the meetings with UNHCR.

ARRA is particularly interested in current issues of concern to refugee populations in the Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa regions, however issues of concern to refugee populations in other regions of the world are also invited.

 Some possible themes you may choose to use include:

  • Women at Risk
  • Protracted Refugee Situations
  • Xenophobia/Racism 
  • Families at Risk
  • Urban Refugee Policy

 How Can I Contribute to the UNHCR NGO Consultations?

You can submit a brief submission to us, focusing on any current issue, but it should be limited to one page in length.  We will then read your submission contact you for more information if required and do our best to include your issues in our papers for discussion at the UNHCR in late June. 

 Please return submission application form with your submission to Lucy Morgan at the Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA).

 All submissions must be received by 31 May.

Submissions must be received by 31 MayVia post or email:  
ATT: Lucy MorganRefugee Council of Australia (RCOA)  
Suite 4A6, 410 Elizabeth Street,Surry Hills NSW 2010

Tel: 02 9211 9333

Fax: 02 9211 9288

 
Email: info@refugeecouncil.org.au  
   

 

 

Submission Form        

 

Name:  
Organisation (if applicable):  

 

Contact Information:

 

Address:  
Email:  
Contact Phone Number:  
Country of Origin:  

 

 

Topic of Submission:

 

Regional Focus (Asia, Africa, Middle East, other)  
Country Focus:  

 

Issues Covered in Submission:
1.2

3.

4.

Recommendations to UNHCR  
1.2.

3

 

 

 

* * Please Attach your 1-page Submission

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21st Century – Baptism in Electromagnetic Mist?

May 22, 2010

 

If anything the twentieth century will be remembered as the century that matter disappeared according to our high priests of Science. Twentieth Century physics has dematerialised matter before our eyes and under our touch. Further it has given a pattern of nothing as the source of the dematerialised matter. When I write “nothing” I’m referring to “no thing”. While we prang our dematerialised cars and battle over dematerialised resources nature continues to create and make life with her templates. These templates aren’t material, unless you consider subatomic vibrations matter. These templates are more like magnetic resonances – wavicles, perhaps, that influence and direct the exteriorization of the tree, the flower and the emu. These morphic resonances, as Rupert Sheldrake calls them, operate in the region of no matter, inside nothing.

As we witness the shift from a material world to the immaterial world we are also experiencing a fracturing of the idea of specific location in space – telecommunications in all its diversity is bringing the globe to one’s home. Video conferencing in virtual rooms with participants from all over the world are a reality now. The next step is to produce a lifesize holographic moving image – holographic TV – with global video conferencing capabilities. Chat Rooms on the internet screen will change to Chat Rooms in your living room with cyber holographic avators for company. The idea that you can’t be in two places at once will be even more untrue.

So, we have one trend that is dematerialising and another that compresses distance.

We also have the trend that the above two is potentially true only for a small proportion of humanity and practically true only for a smaller proportion of this group. This double small proportion of humanity who has access to this knowledge and technology also uses up most of the planet’s resources while the greater majority of humanity is undernourished and living in poverty. In this case we have the trend of concentration of power in the hands of the few and the dematerialisation – the dying of the many.

This is true from a global view.

The global nervous system (that is in one of its foetal stages) of telecommunications has connected all continents and every square inch of the earth’s surface has been traced by geostationary satellites. Google is photographing every street and house being used as locations on their Global Map. GPS enabled mobile phones and in car mapping shows that we are now immersed in an electromagnetic mist of data.

If earth is denser than water, and water is denser than air, and air is more dense than heat, then it is easy to see that heat and air are more dense than the electrographic data that is now sparking through the global nervous electrographic system.

We walk on earth, we drink water, breathe air, need the heat of the Sun – what is the experience of electrographic data ( telephone, TV, internet, GPS, satellite communications etc) ? We don’t eat it, drink it or breathe it and yet it is an element of our experience and it is permeating our being more everyday. What are the implications of our immersion in this “matter”.

Hokusai

There is baptism by water and by fire. What is this baptism in electronic – data mist?

stavros


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